Archive | Industry News & Tips

Half of Side Business Owners Uninsured

You’ve probably heard the terms “side hustle” or “side gigs” being bandied around, but what it really is is a “side business”, a business that is not the owner’s primary source of income. And 25 percent of Americans, roughly 57 million people, have a side business, according to a new survey from the insurance company The Hartford. Continue Reading →

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What Were the Top Ten Stolen Vehicles in 2017?

We all know that car alarms are at best annoying and at worst, useless. Who pays attention anymore?

But which car you own may make the difference between it being stolen or safe, according to the National Insurance Crime Bureau, or the NICB. They released their annual Hot Wheels report, which is not about those little cars you step on in the night when your son leaves them on the floor, but identifies the most stolen vehicles in the United States based on vehicle theft data acquired from the National Crime Information Center (NCIC). Continue Reading →

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It’s Time for Back to School. Need Some Tips?

 

While there may be some kids out there who can’t wait for the first day of school (this writer was one of those few!), many are not as excited, whether it just be losing the freedom of summer or anxiety about doing well academically, making new friends, or trying out for sports.

You can help calm your youngsters’ fears—and maybe a few of your own—by using the tips below that are recommended by teachers.

Have a meet-and-greet.
It may sound like a networking meeting, but meeting the new teacher before the school year starts is a great way to conquer one of kids’ biggest fear: whether or not they will like their teacher. Most schools have an open house or “Back to School” night, which is the perfect time to meet the new teacher without the pressure of a one-on-one get together. Can’t make it to those? Try a phone call or email with the teacher, which many are happy to do, and perhaps ask for a photo so your child can see what they look like. Some sort of video chat would be a good idea too, if the teacher is willing.

Take a tour.
That open house or back to school night provides another fantastic opportunity—to tour the school with your child. Even if they have been to the school before, they may now be in another section or classroom, and the tour can help prevent nervousness on the first day. If it is the same school as the previous year, get your child involved by asking them to show you around—it’s a nice technique that will distract them from any butterflies in their tummies.

Check in with friends.
While many children play with friends from school all summer long, there may be some close school friends who do not live nearby. Reach out to them and schedule a play date or lunch, and perhaps get the carpool organized. Knowing there will be friendly faces on campus on the first day will be very comforting for both you and your student.

Go shopping.
Most teachers will provide a supply list, so make a date for a special shopping trip. Help them feel prepared by providing them with all the right tools, especially if there are some they may need to practice with, like a calculator or protractor. Also, splurge a little bit and let them select one or two items, like a special notebook or a set of colored markers, making the trip a lot more fun.

Let them be kids.
It may be tempting to review last year’s classes the few weeks before school starts, try not to. While learning over the summer is a good thing, it’s also good to let your kids have some down time before classes begin. You can start a few days before the first day to get them prepared, like waking them up and even driving to school or the bus stop, but try not to make them anxious by drilling them about what they should be doing to prepare.

Do you need a policy update for your homeowners, renters, auto or business insurance? Call us on 714-838-1911 or click here to email us a message. Also, keep up to date on our tips, advice, and industry knowledge by following our LinkedIn page.

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A Useful Task for Drones: Investigating Car Accidents

Here in Southern California, we know how just one car crash, even a fender bender, can make our freeways a total mess, rush hour or not. And if it is, sadly, a crash with multiple cars and injuries, the time it takes to obtain evidence and clear it becomes exponentially longer.

But what if a drone, like the one your annoying neighbor keeps playing with, could help? A growing number of police agencies throughout the country are starting to rely on drones to take aerial photographs that will help investigators with the crash, and allow them to clear the scene more quickly. The sheriff’s office in Tazewell County, Illinios used this drone technology to help them investigate a multi-vehicle crash that killed an elderly woman in July. Continue Reading →

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Top Reason for Home Damage? Weather, Says Travelers

Recently, the insurance carrier Travelers released its interactive report titled “Top Ways Things Can Go Wrong”, identifying the most common and costliest causes of home damage. By examining its own national homeowners insurance claim data from 2009 through 2016, the report by Travelers highlights the types of claims that are most prevalent in some of the largest metropolitan areas and breaks down the results by national region and by season. Continue Reading →

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Has Your Teen Just Earned Their Driver’s License? The First Three Months Are Deadliest.

If you think teaching your teen to drive is a harrowing experience, wait until you hand them the keys for their first solo drive. Then their first night out. Has your blood pressure gone up yet?

First of all, you’re not alone. Most parents go through this anxiety, and rightfully so. Sadly, a study by the National Institutes of Health shows that teenage drivers who have had their license for three months or less are eight times more likely to be involved in a collision or near miss. Strangely enough, that stat is compared to the three previous months with the learner’s permit—it must be the supervision in the car that makes them less likely to take risks. Continue Reading →

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Parents: Over Forty Percent of You Are Using Cell Phones While Driving With Your Kids

Photo by Marlon Lara on Unsplash

A recent study published in the Journal of Pediatrics found that about 50 percent of parents hold conversations on their cellphones while driving with their children between the ages of 4 and 10 are in the car. The study, written by a team of researchers from the Children’s Hospital of Philadelphia (CHOP) and the University of Pennsylvania School of Nursing, found that one in three parents are reading text messages, and one in seven are using social media while in the same situation as described above. Continue Reading →

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Fire Season is Here. What Should You Do to Protect Yourself?

It’s the beginning of July, yet fire season seems to have come early, while in 2017, it stayed longer. What Californian can forget the Thomas Fire that raged through Ventura and Santa Barbara counties for several weeks last December, destroying over 440 square miles, 1,000 homes and structures, and many people’s lives. It could have killed more people, yet thanks to the emergency services, only two fatalities were reported. The cost to California firefighters is over $702 million, but the cost of the damage is over $2 billion.

Just a month ago, a fire raged through Aliso Canyon, burning over 175 acres in just a few days. Luckily, no structures or homes were damaged. Continue Reading →

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Tenant Vandalism is on the Rise—What Can Landlords Do?

Dennis Myers will be the first to say life as a landlord it not all it’s cooked up to be. Over his last 20 years of experience of owning rentals in Orange County, he feels as everything is getting worse–tenants aren’t respecting properties, rent payments, or landlords. He says what people don’t realize when they begin renting out properties, is that they are in a “position of weakness, with no advantage whatsoever.” The tenant has the advantage. They can avoid payments, wreak havoc on your property, and you can only invest in a good lawyer who can eventually bring them to court. Either way, it ends in you being out thousands of dollars.

Myers had a recent example in mind: Continue Reading →

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